Tag Archives: grow biointensive

Grow More Vegetables… Part Two

Melons
I hope I didn’t scare you yesterday with that doom and gloom about the future of agriculture. I’m sure if I tried I could round up links to a ton more stories of fear, but I like to keep things positive here, so let’s hurry up and talk about how we can improve things, okay?

The challenges of world hunger, soil depletion, and diminishing resources is overwhelming. And many people tend to look for big solutions, such as mass distribution, miracle high-yield crops, mass producing fertilizer. But all of these solutions, really are harmful and create long-term dependency. How to Grow More Vegetables, the Grow Biointensive way of farming, teaches the world to become self sufficient. To nurture the soil, and to view the ecosystem as a whole, so we can continue to farm generation after generation.

The benefits for this Grow Biointensive way of growing are a:

    67% to 88% reduction in water consumption per unit of production
    50+% reduction in the amount of purchased fertilizer required per unit of production
    99% reduction in the amount of energy used per unit of production
    100+% increase in soil fertility
    200% to 400% increase in caloric production per unit of area
    100+% increase in income per unit of area.

Fantastic, right? Why hasn’t the world already adopted these practices? Well, they have. This type of farming was done in China as far back as 4000 years ago. The Europeans and Latin Americans adopted it long, long ago. But since the invention of mechanized and chemical agriculture, much of these practices have been destroyed. Ecology Action is working to reteach these methods world wide.

But how does this apply to your garden? What is this book going to do to make your garden better? Well, stick around for tomorrow’s post on what How to Grow More Vegetables will benefit you directly.

As for now, I’ll leave you with this quote:

Up to 6 billion microbial life-forms can live in one 5-gram amount of cured compost, about the size of a quarter. Life makes more life, and we have the opportunity to work together with this powerful force to expand our own vitality and that of this planet.

Read Part One & Part Three.

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How to Grow More Vegetables… Part One

…than you ever thought possible on less land that you can imagine.
Butterfly
Did you know that at some point during the years 2014 to 2021, there probably is not going to be enough land to provide the nutrition needed for most of the world’s population using todays current agricultural standards? Scary, isn’t it? Currently, we need about 7,000 to 36,000 square feet of farmable land to keep up with the worlds eating habits. And most people only have access to 9,000 square feet. You do the math.

And most of that land is used for growing only food, which doesn’t produce enough soil-nurturing humus needed to ensure the development of healthy soil. So the land gets stripped of it’s nutrients and becomes un-usable. Again, to keep a garden alive and thriving means to take care of the most basic of elements, the soil. (Here’s a list of 7 Things To Improve Your Soil today)

Regardless of how much soil we have in the world to grow on, we also need to consider the water to irrigate the crops. Many countries, as early as 1992, had only enough water to irrigate 4,000 square feet per person. Far from enough water to keep up with today’s farming practices.

It’s not all doom and gloom, there is a way to change these practices, and that’s what I’m going to talk about this week. This method described in How to Grow More Vegetables shows you how to grow all the food needed for one’s own nutrition, as well as nutrition for the soil on as little as 4,000 square feet.

We are going to start a little mini-series on A Sonoma Garden this week about the book How to Grow More Vegetables written by John Jeavons, the director of Ecology Action. This book features the Grow Biointensive method of mini-farming which has been adopted by UNICEF, Save the Children and the Peace Corps. This book is indispensible for anyone who is interested in food and farming activism and growing. The first part of the book is devoted to explaining the current status of the farming situation in the world as well as a look into the future. The majority of the book, however, explains this Grow Biointensive Method in great detail so you can easily adopt it into your gardening routine.

Tomorrow, we’ll talk about the benefits of Grow Biointensive.

Go to Part Two.

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Filed under books, Soil